Galatea Fine Art announces the “NE COLLECTIVE V” juried show, curated by Edmund Barry Gaither, Director of the National Center of Afro-American Artists and its Museum Division. Click here to read and download the prospectus.

 

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CLARE ASCH:  YOU CANNOT FOLD a FLOOD and PUT IT in a DRAWER

MATTHEW KELLER:  ICONOCLASM

HANNAH LIBMAN:  COLLAGE

April 2-27, 2014

Opening Recepton:  April 4, 6-8pm

 

CLARE ASCH: YOU CANNOT FOLD a FLOOD and PUT IT in a DRAWER

“You cannot fold a flood and put it in a drawer” is a line from a poem by Emily Dickenson that I ran across a few years ago. This image of someone trying to contain a vast force of nature by placing it in a drawer resonated with me because of its dream like imagery.


In my artwork I am interested in exploring the interaction of chance with predetermined structures. Natural phenomena like the flow of water and gravity fascinate me. In the Tideline Series of paintings, mostly large scale watercolors, I bisect the paper into overlapping X shapes that create a scaffold onto which I pour and brush liquid paint. This becomes a physical and metaphorical flood. The division of the paper appears as folds and also acts as a device of containment, the drawer.


I mix my own colors and when the paint is poured this mixture spreads and dries at different rates creating a tideline where the wet paint meets the dry paper. This mix of transparent layers of color and line created by the physical interaction of the media, the mark of my hand and the predetermined structure, sets up a visual dialogue that intrigues me.” – Clare Asch


MATTHEW KELLER: ICONOCLASM

“Iconoclasm (Eikonoklasmos, “Image-breaking”) is the movement against the worship of images, mainly through the destruction of religious icons.  With the transformation and recreation of various religious objects, I will explore the power of religious symbolism and how iconography becomes more powerful when items are averted from traditional ways of use.

What becomes of a bible that can’t be read, a rosary that can’t be felt bead by bead, or a physical statue that is protected from human hands?  Iconoclasm searches for inconsistencies within teachings and hopes to provide a new way to understand the evolution of archaic ritual through contemporary means.

My goal is to provide work that functions as both conceptual and religious art which is recognized as such, by both communities. It’s important, especially at this time, to begin a dialogue concerning the ideas for cultural and social development within the church tradition.  Matthew Keller graduated from Colorado State University with a BFA in Printmaking and Sculpture.” – Matthew Keller


HANNAH LIBMAN: COLLAGE

“I am moved by the world around me, and find great satisfaction in interpreting my observations of people, landscapes, and places that I have visited.  Inspiration comes from many places, including the contemplative time I spend in nature; I absorb the images and experiences in situ, and they later emerge when I am in the studio, involved in the creative process.  I work with a variety of media, including acrylic, water color, and oil, in preparation for the finished piece.  Using collage as my predominant medium, I am inspired by the wealth of possibilities that can be achieved with different textures, forms, shapes, and an endless supply of diverse materials.  Sometimes I feel that I am sculpting with paper, as layers upon layers are applied to a piece before it is complete.

I have had many leadership roles in the art community, and I am a council member of the Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts.  I have been on the faculty of the West Hartford Art League for many years, and have given many demonstrations and workshops on collage.  I have exhibited widely in numerous one-woman and group exhibits throughout the Northeast, and I have won many awards.  I am represented in the permanent collections at Hartford Hospital, Uconn Medical Center, St. Francis Hospital, Mass Mutual Insurance Co., Mass. General Hospital, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, and many other private and corporate collections in this country and abroad.” – Hannah Libman